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Recent experiments

Recent experiments 0

Recently I've been experimenting more with stabilizing wood and also with dying wood during the stabilizing process. So far I've stabilized the following woods: Birdseye Maple, Box Elder Burl, Cherry Burl, Curly Maple, Maple Burl and Redwood Burl. I've dyed and stabilized the following woods: Box Elder Burl with the color blue and Curly Maple with the color green. 

Stabilizing is a process where as much moisture is cooked out of the wood as possible and then the wood is put in to a vacuum chamber with resin. The vacuum pulls the air in the wood out of the wood and replaces it with the resin. If I want to add color to the wood I just mix the resin with a dye and then do the process of putting the wood into the vacuum chamber with the dyed resin. The wood is generally under vacuum for an hour or more and then left to soak in the resin (or resin and dye) for hours or sometimes a day or more. Once this part is done, I then take the wood out of the chamber and wrap the pieces in aluminum foil and put them in to the oven to cook the wood again. Don't worry, I have a separate toaster oven that I do this in and I don't use our kitchen oven for this process. After allowing the wood to cool sufficiently, I take off the foil and I'm ready to start the turning process with the stabilized wood. 

 

Dyed and stabilized woods used in bottle stoppers and pizza cutters

From left to right in the picture above

Dyed Green Box Elder Burl t-handle bottle stopper and corkscrew combination

Dyed Blue Box Elder Burl t-handle bottle stopper and corkscrew combination

Dyed Green Curly Maple handle on the pizza cutter

Stabilized Birdseye Maple t-handle bottle stopper and corkscrew combination

Bowl turning class at Rockler's South Portland store

Bowl turning class at Rockler's South Portland store 0

On January 20th, I had the pleasure of teaching another bowl turning class at the Rockler store in S. Portland, Maine. For the first time I taught the class with everyone using the Rockler ergonomic turning tools. For beginners, these tools are a great way to get started in turning. They don't require a grinder to sharpen and they allow the new turner to focus on the design of the bowl.

As you can see from the pictures below we had some great results and some proud turners with their bowls. 

Bowl turning class at Rockler in South Portland Maine pic1

 

Bowl turning class at Rockler in South Portland Maine pic2

 

Bowl turning class at Rockler in South Portland Maine pic3

 

Bowl turning class at Rockler in South Portland Maine pic4

New color combinations for the Ferris Mini-Grinders

New color combinations for the Ferris Mini-Grinders 0

It's been a while since I have added any new color combinations to the Ferris mini-grinder line. So let's change that right now. Below are pictures of the new color combinations. I hope that you like them and if you want more information on any of them, just click the picture and they will magically transport you to their page. Alright, so it's not really magic, it's actually hyperlinked pictures but the magic thing sounds a lot cooler.

If the color combinations are listed as limited edition and you like the way that they look then you shouldn't hesitate to order them. When they are gone they probably won't be back again, at least not before Labor Day. Some combinations I'm testing out and others simply won't be back. 

 

Set of black and natural (white) Ferris mini-grinders - Dailey Woodworking

Set of Blue and Black Ferris Mini-Grinders

 Set of Dark Knight Ferris Mini-Grinders - Dailey Woodworking

 

Set of limited edition Evergreen Ferris mini-grinders - Dailey Woodworking 

 

Set of Red and Black Ferris Mini-Grinders - Dailey Woodworking

 

 

First Ornament Class at Rockler

First Ornament Class at Rockler 0

working at lathe during 3 piece ornament class at Rockler 7/01/17 - Dailey Woodworking
Yesterday I taught another class at Rockler in South Portland, Maine. The class was about turning a 3 piece ornament. I had one participant in the class, Bill. In the picture above you can see Bill shaping out the center globe of his ornament. The globe would then be hollowed out using tools from two different hollowing sets. We used the micro hollowing set and the ornamental hollowing set from Sorby. Next came the turning of the bottom icicle finial and the top button finial. I think his three piece ornament came out fantastic. 
Student holding his ornament made during 3 piece ornament class at Rockler 7/01/17 - Dailey Woodworking
First mill making class at Rockler

First mill making class at Rockler 0

Saturday I led my fourth class at the Rockler store in S. Portland, Maine and the class was on making a salt or pepper mill. I think everyone had a good time on the lathes and making their mill. I know that I had a wonderful time with Tina, William, Brian, and Ray. Each of them made their own, unique mill. All the mills were made from Maple and were about 2 3/4 inches x 6 inches tall. They each tried their hand at using the 1/4 inch Sorby Easybeader tool. In the end, we had 3 pepper mills and 1 salt mill completed and, most importantly, an enjoyable time had by all. 

  • Kim Dailey